Courses

Not all courses listed below will necessarily be offered in any given year. For details about the courses listed below please consult the relevant departmental calendars. Check the online lecture schedule to determine whether a particular course is offered.

Courses that are recognized or considered for East Asian Studies credit must contain at least 60% East Asian Studies course content/materials. For further information, contact the EAST Coordinator/Academic Advisor.

Check the online lecture schedule to determine whether a particular course is offered for a particular term.

Faculty Identifiers:

AP - Faculty of Liberal Arts & Professional Studies
FA - Faculty of Fine Arts
GL - Glendon

Anthropology

AP/ANTH 1110 6.0 Introduction to Social Anthropology

Social Anthropology is the comparative analysis and understanding of all forms of human condition, past and present. This course provides an introductory overview of Social Anthropology, the discipline that examines what it means to be human. It challenges you to engage with other ways of knowing and being, and to rethink your taken-for-granted knowledge and beliefs. Through the course students will develop critical skills for using anthropological approaches to increase their understanding of and respect for diversity in our rapidly changing world.

AP/ANTH 1120 6.0 Making Sense of a Changing World

In this course you will use anthropological approaches to increase your understanding of global issues in diverse locales. This course challenges you to engage with other ways of knowing and being, and to rethink your taken-for-granted knowledge and beliefs through the comparative analysis of the human condition. This course will take a problem-based approach to a range of topics such as: the effects of race and racism, sources of religious conflict, alternate genders and sexualities, First Nations and health, international development and issues of social inequality. Students are encouraged to bring their own knowledge and experience as the first step in "thinking like an anthropologist" (i.e. rethinking the taken-for-granted). The emphasis in this course is developing skills (analytical thinking, reading, writing).
Note: This is an approved LA&PS General Education course: Social Science
Course credit exclusions:   ANTH 1130 6.0, Prior to FW14:  AP ANTH 1120 6.0

AP/ANTH 3190 3.0 Nutritional Anthropology

Nutritional anthropology, a subfield of medical anthropology, examines the relations between food, culture and biology. Food and eating--although critical to human survival--are both culturally constructed. We eat what we learn to categorize as food in culturally appropriate sequences and contexts. The study of food and eating requires an understanding of the food system from multiple theoretical perspectives. Focus will be on post-colonial theory and the political economy underlying the movement of food. We examine colonialism and food from a global perspective, and explore how colonialism and neocolonialism affect food availability, quality and distribution.

The course develops the concept of culinary colonialism and applies it to past and contemporary food practices. In addition to considerations of power and inequality, we examine commensality, the sharing of food, to understand how individuals and groups use their food resources for social, religious, and political ends. The course concludes with a consideration of how and why food patterns are changing nationally and internationally, and how anthropology can be applied to improve food security for individuals and communities.

Course Credit Exclusion: AS/ANTH 3190 6.0

AP/ANTH 3320 6.0 Religious Ritual and Symbolism

How major anthropological thinkers seek to explain the variety and complexity of human ritual and symbolic behaviours informs this course. Ethnographic examples and materials on ritual events, religious symbolism, and belief systems will enrich this anthropological perspective. A series of topics will be investigated including shamans, sorcery and witchcraft, specific examples of Asian and European religions and New Age religious movements.

After a review of various ways to approach the study of religion within Anthropology with a focus on symbolic theory, the course will concentrate on a number of topics. Some of the areas of interest investigated and developed for extensive discussion include myth, ritual, shamans, sorcery and witchcraft, and religious systems of the Americas, Africa, Europe and Asia.

Students will be encouraged to discuss topics including issues surrounding purity and pollution, gender and religion, religious festivals and performances, and major life concerns like the problem of evil and suffering. Students will be exposed to the anthropological approach to the study of religion through discussions of theories in anthropology and a variety of ethnographic examples. This course will provide the students with grounding in the anthropological approach to the study of religion and expand their knowledge of anthropological techniques and perspectives.

Course Credit Exclusions: AP/ANTH 3320 6.0, prior to Fall 2009: AS/ANTH 3320 3.0 and AS/ANTH 3320 6.0

AP/ANTH 3520 3.0 The Social Lives of Places and Things: Material Culture and the Archaeology of the Contemporary Past

This course addresses the "stuff of life" - including the material things and the constructed places around us. As the physical manifestations of culture, things and places both reflect and influence social relationships. Full of meaning, they can be "read" with the techniques of archaeology and material culture studies, and understood with anthropological and interdisciplinary theory.

Thus, we will examine the social lives of things and places, and consider what they say about human relationships with others and with their environment. Case studies will range from shopping malls to graveyards, zoos, 20th century homes and industrial sites, and battlefields. We will examine material culture in traditional societies, material culture under socialism, and second-hand clothing and recycling/reuse of consumer goods. We will also consider unusual cases such as human artifacts in our solar system (e.g. Moon landing site).

Prerequisities: AP/ANTH 2140 6.0, AP/ANTH 2150 6.0, or AP/ANTH 3130 3.0

Course Credit Exclusion: Prior to Fall 2009: AS/ANTH 3520 3.0

AP/ANTH 4250 6.0 Religious Movements in Global Perspective

The global worldview remains dominated by the idea of the "nation-state", to which all other social relations, communities and organizations are seen as peripheral. An alternative approach would be to take world religious formations as central, and to assess their impact on politics and the state. Religious communities are among the world's oldest transnational organizations, and have survived the onslaught of nationalisms, rationalisms and secularizations.

Today, there is a renewed interest in the role of religion in international relations, as the inspiration for social movements and identity politics, in areas from the environment to human rights. Religious networks provide one of the most important forms of global linkage, and in the process of resettlement, religions gain converts from "non-traditional" sources. This course examines some the adjustments made in such conversions, and also explores in-depth some of the characteristics of fundamentalist religious response to the overall process of globalization.

Credit Exclusion: Prior to Fall 2009: AS/ANTH 4250 6.0, AS/ANTH 4200J 6.0
Format: Three seminar hours

Chinese Language and Literature

AP/CH 1000 6.0 Elementary Modern Standard Chinese

This course serves as an introduction to Modern Standard Chinese, variously known as "Putonghua" (Common language), "Guoyu" (National language), and "Guanhua" (Mandarin). Classroom activities will focus on: 1) proper pronunciation, development of listening comprehension and oral skills, 2) essential grammatical structures of the language, and 3) acquisition of written Chinese. Students are expected to regularly attend class and language laboratory sessions.

Prerequisite: None. Not open to speakers of ANY Chinese dialect. Placement interview required PRIOR TO ENROLMENT

Course Credit Exclusion: None. Prior to Fall 2009: AS/CH 1000 6.0

AP/CH 1010 6.0 Elementary Chinese for Advanced Beginners

This course introduces Modern Standard Chinese (also known as Mandarin). This course is designed for two major groups of students with different initial advantages in learning Chinese: a) those who speak the language but cannot read characters, and b) those who know characters but cannot speak the language. Standard pronunciation, grammatical structures and the writing system is the focus of the course.

Class lectures, classroom language practice, audio tapes and interactive computer programs are co-ordinated in classroom activities. Weekly assignments are given in class and students are expected to regularly attend class and computer laboratory sessions.

Course Credit Exclusion: AP/CH 1000 6.0, AP/CH 2010 6.0. Prior to Fall 2009: AS/CH 1010 6.0

Note: This course prepares for entry into AP/CH 2000 6.0, AP/CH 2030 6.0 or, with permission of the department, AP/CH 3000 6.0.

AP/CH 2000 6.0 Intermediate Modern Standard Chinese

This course builds on AP/CH 1000 6.0. Listening comprehension now involves more extended passages, which are closer to normal native speed. Dialogue on practical matters now also extends to cultural comparisons, society, current events, and problems of modern life. Grammar focuses on sentence-making, including the more difficult patterns, and begins to consider the problems of translation. Students are expected to regularly attend class and computer laboratory sessions.

Prerequisite: AP/CH 1000 6.0, AP/CH 1010 6.0 or permission of the Department. Not open to speakers of ANY Chinese dialect. Placement interview required PRIOR TO ENROLMENT

Course Credit Exclusion: None. Prior to Fall 2009: AS/CH 2000 6.0

AP/CH 2030 6.0 Intermediate Chinese Language and Culture

An intensive intermediate Chinese language and culture course, taught on the York campus and followed by a stay at Fudan University in Shanghai. The course covers language structures and functions, vocabulary and topics on Chinese culture and civilization. This course is taught in Chinese.

Prerequisite: AP/CH 1000 6.0, AP/CH 1010 6.0 or permission of the Department

Course Credit Exclusion: AP/CH 2000 6.0. Prior to Fall 2009: AS/CH 2030 6.0

Format: The course will be offered in the summer session only. Four weeks on York campus: six hours weekly (three hours twice weekly, in evenings) followed by three weeks in Shanghai; five hours contact hours daily, plus excursions.

AP/CH 2200 6.0 Introduction to Chinese Literature

This course is a survey of the major genres of Chinese literature from its ancient origins to the present. It examines selected works representative of the development of the literary tradition in its historical and cultural contexts. Philosophic classics and early historical writing are introduced, but more emphasis is put on poetry, drama, and fiction, and on critical approaches to them.

Note: Readings, lectures, discussions, reports and written assignments will all be in English. Students who are proficient in Chinese may submit their written assignments in Chinese.

Prerequisite: None. Knowledge of Chinese is not expected.

Course Credit Exclusion: AP/CH 2700 6.0. Prior to Fall 2009: AS/CH 2200 6.0

AP/CH 3000 6.0 Advanced Modern Standard Chinese

This course is intended to improve the students' ability to conduct conversation in both practical and cultural situations, and to start training them to read some unannotated works written for Chinese readers. Dictionaries are introduced along with the methods of finding characters by radicals, stroke count, and Pinyin. Unannotated materials (topical pieces from newspapers, magazines) and films are also used, and discussions are based on the reading and viewing. There is practice in creating logical sequences of sentences and developing a reasoned argument.

Prerequisite: AP/CH 2000 6.0 or AP/CH 2010 6.0 or permission of the Department. Placement interview required PRIOR TO ENROLMENT

Course Credit Exclusion: None. Prior to Fall 2009: AS/CH 3000 6.0

AP/CH 3010 6.0 Modern Standard Chinese for Speakers of Cantonese or Other Dialects

The course is in four parts: (1) The basic sounds and the pinyin system, and the simplified characters; (2) Language reform in Modern China; (3) The development of modern literary Chinese as illustrated by selections from works of modern Chinese literature; (4) Comprehension and practice of the standard spoken language. Students learn to hold conversations and discussions in Modern Standard Chinese.

Prerequisite: Permission of the Department; not open to speakers of Modern Standard Chinese (Mandarin). Placement interview required PRIOR TO ENROLMENT

Course Credit Exclusion: None. Prior to Fall 2009: AS/CH 3010 6.0

AP/CH 3400 6.0 Women in Contemporary Chinese Culture

The major developments and changes in the lives of women in contemporary China will be analyzed and discussed in this course. Themes such as gender, class, nationalism, and Confucianism as they relate to the lives of Chinese women in contemporary Chinese culture will be examined critically. The course takes various approaches in order to deepen the students' understanding of women's lives in the contemporary culture in China and to encourage critical thinking within a contemporary context.

Prerequisite: AP/CH 3000, AP/CH 3010 or permission of the Department

Course Credit Exclusion: None. Prior to Fall 2009: AS/CH 3400 6.0

AP/CH 3600 6.0 Lu Xun: Representative Works

This course deals with the creative works of Lu Xun, China's leading twentieth century writer. Textual analysis of his short stories, prose poems, theoretical and satirical essays is organized around such themes as the spiritual sickness of the Chinese nation, reevaluation of tradition, women's position in society, and the role of literature and art. Language of instruction: Modern Standard Chinese (Mandarin).

Prerequisite: AP/CH 3010 6.0 or AP/CH 3000 6.0, and at least one 2000-level Chinese literature course, or permission of the department

Course Credit Exclusion: None. Prior to Fall 2009: AS/CH 3600 6.0

AP/CH 3660 6.0 Modern Chinese Drama: Cao Yu and His Contemporaries (in Chinese)

Through an analysis of some of the representative works by Cao Yu and by other major playwrights this course offers a picture of the main thematic and formal patterns of modern Chinese drama (Huaju) as they developed in the Republican era (1911-1949).
Prerequisite: AP/CH 2200 6.00 or equivalent. Course credit exclusions: None.

AP/CH 3710 6.0A Women Writers in Modern China (trans)

A study of the fiction of the major women writers from the literary revolution of the early 1920s to the present, the development of themes, forms and styles seen in the context of modern Chinese literature and against the background of China's patriarchal tradition.
Prerequisite: Any 2000-level Chinese literature course, or AP/HUMA 2930 9.00 or AP/SOSC 2180 9.00 or AP/GL/WMST 2510 9.00. Course credit exclusion: None.

AP/CH 3711 3.0A Women Writers in Contemporary China

This course studies fiction by major women writers from the literary revolution of the 1920s to the present; themes, forms and styles are explored in the context of modern China. Discussions are guided by feminist scholarship on modern Chinese literature.

Language of instruction: English (Students who are proficient in Chinese may submit their written work in Chinese)

Format: Three class hours per week

AP/CH 3790 6.0 Contemporary Chinese Culture Through Literary Texts and Film (taught in Chinese)

Post-Mao China has witnessed a great deal of ideological, economic, and social change in the past two decades. Of the various kinds of art that mirror these changes, "new wave" text-based works and film have sparked the hottest debates and most successfully depicted the implications of these changes for personal life and society at large.

By examining representative "new wave" text-based works and films in the context of modern history, this course explores the relationship between ideology and art. Focussing on such aspects as narrative technique and allegory and by investigating the film versions of some of the literary texts under discussion, this course offers insights into contemporary China.

Prerequisite: AP/CH 3010 6.0 or AP/CH 3000 6.0, and at least one 2000-level Chinese literature course, or permission of the department

Course Credit Exclusion: None. Prior to Fall 2009: AS/CH 3790 6.0

AP/CH 3791 6.0 Contemporary Chinese Culture Through Literary Texts and Film (taught in English)

Post-Mao China has witnessed a great deal of ideological, economic, and social change in the past two decades. Of the various kinds of art that mirror these changes, "new wave" text-based works and film have sparked the hottest debates and most successfully depicted the implications of these changes for personal life and society at large. By examining representative "new wave" text-based works and films in the context of modern history, this course explores the relationship between ideology and art. Focusing on such aspects as narrative technique and allegory and by investigating the film versions of some of the literary texts under discussion, this course offers insights into contemporary China. Students who are proficient in Chinese may submit their written assignments in Chinese.

Prerequisite: None. Knowledge of Chinese is not expected for students enrolled in AP/CH 3791 6.0

Course Credit Exclusion: None. Prior to Fall 2009: AS/CH 3791 6.0

AP/CH 3800 3.0 Chinese-Canadian Diasporic Literature

This blended course studies Chinese-Canadian literature from as early as the 1890 to contemporary times, focusing mainly on fiction but including also poetry, prose essays, and drama both in English and Chinese. While examining these works' artistic qualities, it explores diasporic topics of social and cultural identity, the interaction between traditional roots and the new environment, and between cultural assimilation and resistance, as reflected in these works. Course credit exclusions: None.

Format:
1. Participation in & contribution to online discussion 20%
2. Term paper 30%
3. Written Test 25%
4. Oral presentations: 25%

Texts: Course kit and assigned online reading materials

AP/CH 3810 3.0 Chinese-American Diasporic Literature

The course studies Chinese-American literature from its origins in the mid-nineteenth century to recent times, focusing on fiction and biography. It examines its literary developments, as well as its representative writers and works. Both literary characteristics and socio-historical values of some representative works will be explored in the course.
Course credit exclusions: None.

AP/CH 3820 6.0 Modern and Contemporary Chinese Literature

An introduction to modern Chinese literature from 1900 to the present, concentrating on fiction but including also poetry, prose essays and drama, both in Chinese and English translation. The course explores the development and variety of the literature over the period. Emphasis will be given to how the change has affected both the content and shape of literary writing.
Prerequisite: AP/CH 2200 6.00 or equivalent. Course credit exclusions: None.

AP/CH 4050 6.0A Advanced Chinese for Business

The course is devoted to the specialized language of business-related subjects including business etiquette. Materials include a text of formal conversations on typical business transactions, newspaper and journal articles, as well as TV news broadcasts on foreign trade and economic development in the world.

Prerequisite: AP/CH 3000 6.0, AP/CH 3010 6.0, or equivalent, or permission of the Department

Course Credit Exclusion: None. Prior to Fall 2009: AS/CH 4050 6.0

AP/CH 4300 6.0A Classical Chinese Fiction

This course is a study of major developments in the history and art of traditional Chinese fiction. It examines selected works written in both classical and vernacular language forms that represent a variety of story forms, from chih-kuai .. (Accounts of Anomalies), ch'uan-ch'i ...(Transmitting the remarkable), pian-wen .. (Transformation Texts), hua-pen .. (Storybooks) to longer classical novels from the Ming to Qing dynasties.

The literary approach focuses on plot construction, characterization, narrative stance, techniques of conveying meaning, and historical and cultural connotations in the texts. The rich sources of classical Chinese fiction—history, mythology, Daoism, and Buddhism—are probed as they were transformed in the fiction of different eras.

Prerequisite: AP/CH 3000 6.0, AP/ CH 3010 6.0, or any 3000-level Chinese literature course, or permission of the department

Format: Three hours weekly, one hour of lecture and a two-hour of seminar discussion (In Chinese)

AP/CH 4800 6.0A Humor and Satire in Modern and Contemporary Chinese Literature

This course introduces the world's oldest tradition of humor and satire, and focuses on their characteristics in both written and oral works in modern and contemporary Chinese.  Students learn the theory and the relationship between humor and satire, as well as their particular artistic devices.  Through reading, acting and analysis of the selected works they experience how the Chinese language is creatively, colorfully and skillfully used and understand why such works are highly appreciated by the Chinese people in their daily lives.  Throughout the course, the students are encouraged to bring examples of humor/satire encountered in their own daily lives or reading, and to experiment with composing their own creative humorous and satirical works in Chinese.
Prerequisite:  Any 3000 level Chinese language or literature course, or with permission of the department. Course credit exclusions: None.

AP/CH 4880 / HUMA 4800 6.0 Cultural Translation and Chinese Modernities

Analyzes what meanings of modern and contemporary Chinese literature from the 1900s to the present have both been produced and lost through cultural and media translation. Applies postmodern theories to examine fiction with their recreations into different cultures and into various media of stage productions, TV dramas and films. Investigates the cultures, history, and social conditions in Chinese modernities, both on the mainland and in the diasporas.
Prerequisites: Any 3000 level Chinese literature or culture course, or with permission of the department. Course credit exclusions: None.

Dance - Faculty of Fine Arts

FA/DANC 2510H 3.0 Introduction To World Dance Practices: East Asian Dance

Introduces the study of folk, ritual and theatrical dance traditions from countries such as China, Japan and Korea, including contemporary Butoh. Different countries selected for study in different years. Studio/discussion. Prerequisite: FA/DANC 1500 6.00 or permission of the department; more advanced students will be placed in FA/DANC 3510 F 3.00 Intermediate East Asian Dance Cultures. Open to majors and non-majors.

FA/DANC 3510H 3.0 Intermediate to World Dance Practices: East Asian Dance

Studies selected folk, ritual and theatrical dance traditions from countries such as China, Japan and Korea, including contemporary Butoh. Different countries selected for study in different years. Studio/discussion. Prerequisite: FA/DANC 1500 6.00 or FA/DANC 2510 F 3.or permission of the department. Open to majors and non-majors.

Economics

AP/ECON 1900 3.0 Microeconomics for Business & Life

Introduces microeconomics as the basis for making smart choices in life as consumers, businesspeople, investors, and informed citizen
judging government policies. Focuses on cost/benefit analysis of all decisions. Provides intuitive fundamentals for economic literacy without the mathematical details of AP/ECON 1000 3.00. Course credit exclusions: None.
Note: If you have successfully completed, or are
currently enrolled in AP/ECON 1000 3.00, GL/ECON
2500 3.00, or SB/INTL 1200 3.00 you will NOT
receive credit for AP/ECON 1900.
Note: Students intending to complete a minor or major in economics (ECON), business economics (BUEC) or financial and business economics (FBEC) are advised to take ECON 1000. However, students achieving a B grade or better can use AP/ECON 1900 3.0 to replace AP/ECON 1000 3.0 in requirements for the economics major or minor (ECON), business economics major (BUEC), or financial and business economics major (FBEC).
Note: AP/ECON 1900 3.00 will not count for business and society major credit. PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusion: AS/ECON 1900 3.00.

AP/ECON 1910 3.0 Macroeconomics for Business and Life

Introduces macroeconomics as the basis for making smart choices as consumers, businesspeople, investors, and informed citizens judging government policies. Focuses on the performance of market economies - measured by GDP growth, unemployment, inflation - and appropriate roles for government monetary and fiscal policies. Provides intuitive fundamentals for economic literacy without the mathematical details of AP/ECON 1010 3.00.
Note: If you have successfully completed, or are currently enrolled in AP/ECON 1010 3.00, GL/ECON 2510 3.00, or SB/INTL 1210 3.00 you will NOT receive credit for AP/ECON 1910.
Note: Students intending to complete a minor or major in economics (ECON), business economics (BUEC) or financial and business economics (FBEC) are advised to take AP/ECON 1010 3.00. However, students achieving a B grade or better can use AP/ECON 1910 3.00 to replace AP/ECON 1010 3.00 in requirements for the economics major or minor (ECON), business economics major (BUEC), or financial and business economics major (FBEC).
Note: AP/ECON 1910 3.00 will not count for business and society major credit.
PRIOR TO FALL 2011: Course credit exclusion: AP/ECON 1900 3.00 and AS/ECON 1900 3.00.

AP/ECON 3150 3.0A/M International Trade

Introduction to the theories of international trade and trade policy. The course develops and analyzes the classical and neo-classical theories of comparative advantage as well as the new intra-industry trade models based on imperfect market and scale economics. These theories are applied to the analysis of trade policy, commercial policy, international transfers and factor movements.

Prerequisites: AP/ECON 1000 3.0, AP/ECON 1010 3.0 or equivalent

Course Credit Exclusion: GL/ECON 4290 6.0. Prior to Fall 2009: AK/ECON 3570 3.0, AS/ECON 3150 3.0

AP/ECON 3550 3.0A Economic Growth and Development

Studies the basic causes of poverty in the Third World and covers the characteristics of economic under development; income and wealth distribution; education; population growth; unemployment and migration; the role of capital; labour and technology in development; use of market forces.

Prerequisites: AP/ECON 1000 3.0, AP/ECON 1010 3.0, AP/ECON 1900 3.0 or equivalent

Course Credit Exclusion: Prior to Fall 2009: AS/ECON 3310 3.0, AK/ECON 3550 3.0

AP/ECON 3560 3.0 Economic Policy in Developing Countries

Studies the policies and institutions for overcoming economic retardation in the Third World and covers the strategies of sectoral growth and development; rural vs. urban development; government intervention, planning and private enterprise; fiscal and monetary policies; domestic market vs. export orientation; domestic vs. foreign investment; international trade and indebtedness.

Prerequisites: AP/ECON 3550/3559 3.0 or equivalent

Course Credit Exclusion: Prior to Fall 2009: AS/ECON 3320 3.0, AK/ECON 3560 3.0

AP/ECON 4129 3.0A International Trade Policy and Economic Integration

The course deals with current policy issues in international trade and economic integration. We give special attention to specific institutional settings such as: NAFTA, the European Union, and the World Trade Organization, and to specific issues in trade policy such as the role of foreign direct investment and trans-national corporations, regionalism and multilateralism, development North-South relations, trade and the environment, agriculture and rural development, Canadian and U.S. trade policy, and trade and labour rights.

Prerequisite: AP/ECON 3150 3.0 or equivalent

Course Credit Exclusion: None. Prior to Fall 2009: AS/ECON 4129 3.0

AP/ECON 4190 3.0M Topics in International Trade

This course builds on exposure to the basic trade theories in AP/ECON 3150 3.0 (which is recommended but not a formal prerequisite). We will discuss trade policy instruments and trade policy setting institutions, how trade police is set, and the effects that trade policies and globalization have on economy. The course will focus on a number of important topics in commercial policy, international factor mobility, distortions, imperfect competition and strategic trade policy.

Prerequisites: AP/ECON 2300 3.0, AP/ECON 2350 3.0, AP/ECON 3150 3.0 or equivalent

Course Credit Exclusion: None. Prior to Fall 2009: AS/ECON 4190 3.0

Film - Faculty of Fine Arts

FA/FILM 3610A 3.0 Studies in National Cinema: Chinese Cinema

Provides students with the opportunity to view and study some 15 rare examples of early Chinese cinema, most from the silent period. These films demonstrate the growth of a film industry in pre-Revolutionary China. They are also indicative of the cultural and political values of China at the time.

The aim of the course in examining this work is to place it both in the context of Chinese society and Chinese culture and in the perspective of world cinema during this period. Prerequisite: FA/FILM 1400 6.00 or permission of the Film Department.

FA/FILM 3610D 3.0 Studies in National Cinema: Japanese Cinema

Introduces Japanese cinema in the socio-historical context of both the film industry and modern Japanese history. Special emphasis will be placed on the relationship between the body and landscape in terms of colonialism, regionalism, nationalism, and globalization.

Geography

AP/GEOG 4395 3.0 Asian-Pacific Development: Geographical Perspectives

The rapid transformation of societies in East and Southeast Asia represents one of the most imporatnat shifts in the geographical structure of the global economy in recent decades. Development in the countries of the Asia-Pacific region is, however, the product of global linkages as well as internal socio-economic and political change. This course explores such linkages and focuses upon those that integrate and implicate Canada in the socio-economic development of the region.

In particular, the course examines the geographical flow of migration, trade, investment, and aid between Asia and Canada, and relates these flows to social and economic change in Asian societies. Topics to be covered will include: approaches to understanding Pacific Asian development; the construction of Pacific regionalism; development and restructuring processes in East and Southeast Asian societies; the social and economic dimensions of Canadian aid and human rights advocacy in Asia. Students will have opportunities to conduct studies of the Asian communities that have emerged in Toronto, and their place of origin.

Prerequisites: 84 credits successfully completed or written permission of the Course Director

Course Credit Exclusion: Prior to Fall 2001: AP/GEOG 3390K 3.0; AP/GEOG 4390K 3.0

History

AP/HIST 1030 6.0 Imperialism & Nationalism in Modern Asia

This course examines the modern evolution of Asian countries with special emphasis on imperialism and the rise of nationalism. With distinctive political, cultural, and socio-economic traditions, Asian countries shared the experience of western imperialism's expansionist pressures. Those traditions helped mould the varieties of nationalistic responses to that intrusion, culminating in the independence struggles which, in the post-1945 era, created the modern nation states of today's Asia. The three stages - traditional paradigms, imperialism's impact, and nationalism's struggles – provide the framework for our survey of modern Asian history.

AP/HIST 2710 6.0 History of East Asia

This course explores how distinctive patterns of government, society and culture emerged over four millennia in East Asia - primarily China and Japan - and how this endogenous development prepared those nations to confront and challenge Western supremacy in the modern world.
Course credit exclusion: AP/HIST 2710 6.00 (prior to Fall 2011).

PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusion: AS/HIST 2710 6.00.

AP/HIST 3760 6.0 Modern Japan

This course begins with Japan's unification as a nation in 1600 and ends with contemporary times. A general historical survey will complement the detailed examination of selected topics which best illustrate Japan's modern development. Political, social, cultural, and economic trends will receive roughly equal treatment. The student should gain a broad yet multifaceted understanding of Japan's rise from obscurity to empire, of its disastrous defeat and occupation by the Allied Powers, and of its post-war recovery to become a leading economic force in today's world.

AP/HIST 3761 6.0 Modern Japan: Meiji Restoration to Postwar Era (1868-Present)

This course concerns modern Japan from the Meiji Restoration of 1867-1868, its relations with Europe, the Americas, and its East Asian neighbors on its tumultuous path to the Second World War, as well as its postwar efforts towards reconstruction and resurgence.  It examines the historical underpinnings of Japan as we see it today-economy, society, culture, politics, its successes and failures.  In a mere 150 years, Japan transformed itself from a feudal, decentralized regime into a highly centralized, internationally respected capitalist government and economy.  We evaluate that history as reflected in society, the economy, cultural, politics, and international relations.
Course credit exclusion: AP/HIST 3760 6.00.

AP/HIST 3762 6.0 The History of Vietnam from Prehistory to French ColoniaL Era

This course covers the history of the country now known as Vietnam from ancient times into the beginning of the period of French Colonialism. It deals with the growth of the Vietnamese state and the development of Vietnamese culture, as well as with Vietnam's relations with China.

Course Credit Exclusion: Prior to Fall 2009: AS/HIST 3762 6.0

AP/HIST 3765 6.0 Korea: A Long History

This is a survey course of Korean history from its Paleolithic origins to the mid-20th century. Its broad scope is designed to introduce some of the important developments and problems in Korea's path to modernity.

Course Credit Exclusion: AS/HIST 3765 3.00 (prior to Fall/Winter 2004-2005).

AP/HIST 3766 3.0 Korea Since WW II

This course is a survey of twentieth-century Korean history, with emphasis on the social movements and economic development following Korea's division in 1945. Although initial lectures and discussions review early twentieth-century history, the course focuses on late twentieth-century developments, including US and USSR occupations (1945-1948) after Japanese colonization and the Korean War (1950-1953).

Students then review the consequences of the war including Kim Il-Sung's policies in the DPRK and Park Chung-Hee military regime (1961-1979) in the ROK. Finally, students consider the consequences of late-twentieth modernization, the labor and student movements of the 1970s and 1980s and the civil movements of the 1990s. The course concludes with a discussion of prospects for unification. The approach is interdisciplinary, inter-periodic, inter-regional and international.

AP/HIST 3768 3.0 Sages and Statecraft in East Asia

This course analyzes how Confucianism developed from antiquity to about 1800 and how it helped shape government policy and interstate relations during key periods of Chinese, Japanese and Korean history.

Course Credit Exclusion: Prior to Fall 2009: AS/HIST 3768 3.0

AP/HIST 3770 6.0A Modern China

This course examines the process by which modern China emerged from the ruins of the traditional order, tracing the history of China from the early 19th century to the present.

Course Credit Exclusion: AP/HIST 3771 3.0, AP/HIST 3772 3.0. Prior to Fall 2009: AS/HIST 3770 6.0

AP/HIST 3775 3.0 History of Hong Kong

This course examines the economic, political, social and cultural development of the city state of Hong Kong and its environs, within the context of Chinese and British imperial history, from its 19th-century foundations to the present.

Course Credit Exclusion: Prior to Fall 2009: AS/HIST 3775 3.0

AP/HIST 3776 3.0 History of Singapore

This course explores the history of Singapore, primarily in the 19th and 20th centuries. Geographic, political, social and ethnic themes are emphasized, with particular focus on the roles of Malay, Indian and Chinese peoples.
Course credit exclusions: None. PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusions: AS/HIST 3776 3.00, AS/HIST 3930B 3.00 (prior to Fall/Winter 2003-2004).

AP/HIST 3779 6.0 History of Chinese Migrations and Overseas Chinese Communities

Studies the history of Chinese migrations and emergence of Chinese diaspora since the sixteenth century, conditions and circumstances that led millions of Chinese to leave their home regions to seek opportunities elsewhere within the Chinese realm or overseas, interactions between Overseas Chinese and host societies, especially in Southeast Asia and North America, and establishment of overseas Chinese communities.
Course credit exclusions: None.

AP/HIST 4071 6.0A (AP/SOSC 4051 6.0) Education and Society in Modern China

In 20th century China, education reform has been an important factor in social, political and ideological upheavals. This course examines education and society in China since the 18th century; other East Asian societies may be brought in for comparison.

Course Credit Exclusion: Prior to Fall 2009: AS/HIST 4071 6.0. Prior to FallWinter 2003-2004: AS/HIST 4050H 6.0

AP/HIST 4072 6.0 Migrations and Diaspora : Modern Chinese Experience

This course explores the history of migration within China and the migration of Chinese people to other parts of the world, primarily in the 19th and 20th centuries.

Course Credit Exclusion: Prior to Fall 2009: AS/HIST 4072 6.0; AS/HIST 4930B 6.00 (prior to Fall/Winter 2003-2004).

AP/HIST 4760 6.0 War & Peace in East Asia: The Second World War

The experience of the Second World War and its aftermath in China, Japan and the larger Pacific region, including the rise of Communism in China and the transformation of Japan during and after the American occupation.

AP/HIST 4761 6.0 Education and Society in Modern China

In 20th-century China, education reform has been an important factor in social, political and ideological upheavals. This course examines education and society in China since the 18th century; other East Asian societies may be brought in for comparison.

Note: Priority is given to History, East Asian Studies and Social Science Honours majors and minors who have successfully completed at least 84 credits.

PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusions: AS/HIST 4050H 6.00 (prior to Fall/Winter 2003-2004), AS/HIST 4071 6.00.

AP/HIST 4763 6.0 China Modern: A Cultural History

This course uses a cultural historical approach to examine the question of Chinese modernity. It focuses on the processes, technologies, and social agents that transformed Chinese culture in the tumultuous period from the first Opium War in 1842 to the 1949 Communist Revolution. The course begins with an introduction to cultural historical methodology. We read key theoretical works in this field, most of which are focused on European or North American history. We then study how scholars of China have applied, adapted, or elaborated on this methodology in their studies of late imperial (1842-1911) and Republican China (1912-1949).
Prerequisites: AP/HIST 2710 6.00 or AP/HIST 3760 6.00 or AP/HIST 3761 3.00 or AP/HIST 3770 6.00 or AP/HIST 3771 3.00 or AP/HIST 3772 3.00 or AP/HIST 3775 3.00 or AP/HUMA 2420 9.00 or AP/HUMA 2430 9.00 or AP/HUMA 2435 9.00 or AP/HUMA 3500 6.00 or AP/HUMA 3505 3.00 or AP/HUMA 3506 3.00 or AP/HUMA 3510 6.00. Course credit exclusions: None. Open to: History and East Asian Studies Honours Majors and Minors who have successfully completed at least 84 credits.

AP/HIST 4765 6.0 Re-thinking Gender in East Asian History

This course explores shared and divergent gender principles and gendered practices in pre-modern and modern China, Korea and Japan. Focusing on women's experience, it examines such topics as women and work, religion, medicine, sexuality, and cultural production.

AP/HIST 4766 6.0 Communist Revolutions in East Asia

Examines the complex external, and more importantly internal, causes, developments, and consequences of civil conflicts - in China, (1945-1949), Korea (1950-1953), and Vietnam (1954-1975) - in post-WWII East Asia.
This course is restricted to History or East Asian Studies Honours majors and minors who have successfully completed at least 84 credits. Prerequisites: AP/HIST 1030 6.00 or AP/HIST 2710 6.00 or AP/HIST 3760 6.00 or AP/HIST 3762 6.00 or AP/HIST 3766 3.00 or AP/HIST 3770 6.00 or AP/HIST 3775 3.00 or AP/HUMA 2420 9.00 or AP/HUMA 2430 9.00 or AP/HUMA 2435 9.00 or AP/HUMA 3500 6.00 or AP/HUMA 3505 3.00 or AP/HUMA 3506 3.00 or AP/HUMA 3510 6.00 or departmental permission. Course credit exclusions: None.

Human Rights and Equity Studies

AP/HREQ 4651 3.0 Chinese Rights and Virtues In East Asia

Compares and contrasts Chinese virtues of benevolence, propriety, righteousness, wisdom and faithfulness with Western human rights in both contemporary and ancient perspectives. Compares universal claims of Western social and cultural rights with particular forms of virtue in Chinese society.

Humanities

AP/HUMA 1400 9.0A Culture and Society in East Asia

No single course can adequately address the richness and complexity of the cultures and societies of East Asia. However, this course will introduce students to important practices and concepts from a broadly humanistic perspective and offer a peek into what it might have been like to actually live in East Asia before widespread globalization. In order to do this, we will examine elements of the social, political, philosophical, artistic, and economic traditions that shaped both elite and popular culture in East Asia from the 1600s to the early 1800s.

Our sources will include cultural artifacts (e.g., poems, paintings, clothing, etc.) from this period, writings by East Asians on their own and their neighboring societies, observations on East Asia by contemporary outsiders, and secondary sources by modern scholars who explore particularly challenging topics in depth. By analyzing both the forging of shared beliefs and the development of distinct identities in this critical period, we can better understand the ties between historical and contemporary East Asia, as well as between East Asia and the rest of the world.

Though the primary goal of the course is to teach students about a time and place quite removed from our own, the course is also designed to strengthen each student's ability to comprehend and critique his or her own culture. As a foundation for broader study at the university level, we will place significant emphasis on analytical skills, class participation, research methods, and writing. Since many aspects of East Asian culture will fall outside of the course curriculum, students will be expected to learn the critical skills of asking important and interesting questions and then figuring out how to produce informative and satisfying answers.

Course Credit Exclusion: None. Prior to Fall 2009: AS/HUMA 1400 9.0

AP/HUMA 1420 9.0A Introduction to Korean Culture

This course offers an introduction to the study of Korean culture through a historical survey of literary, social, religious and political trends from ancient times to the present.
Note: This is an approved LA&PS General Education course
Course credit exclusion: AP/HUMA 2420 9.00 (prior to Fall 2014).
PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusion: AS/HUMA 2420 9.00.

AP/HUMA 1435 9.0A Japanese Culture, Literature and Film

An introduction to Japanese culture centred around comparisons of major classical, modern and postmodern literary works - including manga comics - as well as their screen adaptations or other related films and anime.
Note: This is an approved LA&PS General Education course
Course credit exclusion: AP/HUMA 2435 9.00 (prior to Fall 2014).
PRIOR TO FALL 2009:  Course credit exclusions: AS/HUMA 2435 9.00, AS/HUMA 3420 6.00 (prior to Fall/Winter 2004-2005), AS/JP 3720 6.00 (prior to Fall/Winter 2004-2005), FA/FILM 3710 6.00 (prior to Fall/Winter 2004-2005).

AP/HUMA 1855 9.0A Buddhism and Asian Cultures

This course introduces students to the diversity of Buddhist ideas and practices in Asia.  Exploring Buddhism as a living tradition, the course focuses on the impact and interpretation of Buddhism in historical and contemporary cultures.  The course develops a background in basic Buddhist philosophy in order to explore its broader cultural impact in literature, art, ritual, ethics, economics, social interaction and politics. Note: This is an approved LA&PS General Education course

AP/HUMA 1865 6.0 Introduction to World Religions

A comparative examination of the history, literature, practices and social aspects of the religious traditions of South Asia (Buddhism, Hinduism), East Asia (China, Korea, Japan), Europe and West Asia (Judaism, Christianity and Islam), Africa and Native America. Note: Not all traditions will be offered in any given year.
Note: This is an approved LA&PS General Education course
Course credit exclusions: AP/HUMA 1860 6.00, AP/HUMA 2800 9.00 (prior to Fall 2014), AP/SOSC 2600 9.00 (prior to Fall 2014).
PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusions: AK/HUMA 1860 6.00, AS/HUMA 2800 9.00.

AP/HUMA 2430 9.0A The Asian Canadian Experience

In recent years, the experience of Asian Americans has become an important area of scholarship in ethnic and cultural studies. Drawing on a wide variety of sources and genres – oral history, literature, memoir, poetry, drama, film, etc. – this course examines the historical and contemporary Asian Canadian experience, both as lived reality and as constructed in works of the imagination.

Invited participation of Asian Canadians involved in the arts constitutes an integral part of the course as the issues that have emerged as central to writers and other artists from that community such as the trope of "silence", and themes related to ethnic, gender, and other forms of identity will be highlighted throughout the year.

Course Credit Exclusion: None. Prior to Fall 2009: AS/HUMA 2430 9.0

AP/HUMA 3500 6.0A Chinese Culture in Hong Kong, Taiwan and Singapore: Their Literary Texts and Film

Through an analysis of major works of literature and film, this course offers a picture of the cultural life of three variant Chinese communities, as well as an understanding of the interaction between these groups and the contemporary globalized context. Various Chinese communities live in Asia, outside Mainland China. They have developed unique socio-political features that clearly differentiate them from Mainland China as well as from each other. Yet, they share some common ground in terms of written or spoken language, as well as ethical and religious values.

Through close textual reading and filmic analysis of some major literary and cinematic works from different Chinese areas such as Taiwan, Singapore and Hong Kong, this course offers an understanding of the complexity of Chinese culture. This course problematizes topics such as family life, love and sexuality, education and law. Also, it analyses the interaction between Chinese culture and the contemporary globalized context. Issues such as that of a monolithic notion of Chineseness will be discussed and essentialist constructions as well as nationalist agendas will be analysed.

AP/HUMA 3505 3.0 Investigation of Things: Approaches to Nature, Body & Machines in Chinese Science

This course introduces students to pre-modern Chinese engagements with the natural world (spanning science, technology, and natural philosophy) through analysis of empirical practices, conceptual frameworks, body arts, and material culture.

AP/HUMA 3506 3.0A Scientific Modernity in East Asia

The course will begin by asking why science became such a core problem of East Asian modernity and then explore issues surrounding the assimilation of science, the adoption of scientific values, and the dissemination of scientific practices. Though we will grapple with the idea of "progress" throughout the course, the course is not concerned with East Asian development towards any particular standard of scientific achievement. Instead, it focuses on the complex ways that East Asian understandings of science shifted over time, and it will examine the implications of these shifts for both East Asian identities and scientific practice itself.

These topics will open up questions about "traditional" knowledge in East Asia, East Asian nationalisms, changes in moral and spiritual culture, and the geo-politics of East Asia's place in the international community. As we struggle with the role of science in East Asia, we will also develop a deeper understanding of science itself, including its relation to power, its claims of objectivity, and its adaptability to new contexts. The concepts of crisis, reinvention, and identity will be employed to analyze not only East Asian history, but scientific culture.

AP/HUMA 3510 6.0A Religion, Gender and Korean Culture

The purpose of this course is to introduce basic texts in order to explore the interactions of religion and gender from the traditional to the modern period in Korea and to relate this material to the general process of cultural development. Korea's native shamantistic traditions were early supplanted by religions imported through China such as Buddhism, Taoism and Confucianism. The course is designed to acquaint students with little or no background with some of the classics in the field.

The dominant role of women in Shamanism was reversed as Buddhism and later Cofucianism became state religions and patriarchal values were established. With the advent of Christianity at the dawn of modern era sex roles were again realigned.

Twentieth century works reveal the extent to which the contemporary period is witnessing a resurgence of native religious beliefs as Koreans attempt to redefine their cultural identity in the international age.

Course Credit Exclusion: Prior to Fall 2009: AS/HUMA 3425 6.0; Prior to Fall/Winter 2003-2004 : AS/HUMA 3000D 6.0

AP/HUMA 3675 6.0 Fantastic Journeys in Western and Eastern Literature & Film

A study of the journey theme in ancient and modern literary texts, both Western and Eastern, and in cinematic works. The theme of journey will be analyzed through its representations in different artistic media (literature and cinema), in genetically unrelated cultural contexts, (West and East), and in different epochs. The notion of journey will be extended and problematized beyond its geographical connotation, including picaresque, transcultural, spatial, temporal, and magical narratives. Also, different literary genres – epic, lyric, and autobiographic and fictional – will be examined.

Course Credit Exclusion: Prior to Fall 2009: AS/HUMA 3675 6.0, AS/HUMA 3000T 6.0

AP/HUMA 3940 6.0  Feminine in Chinese Culture

This course explores the feminine idea in modern Chinese culture through such topics as love, sexuality, feminism and the women's liberation movement of the 20th century. The experience of Chinese women in Hong Kong, Taiwan and North America are also explored through contemporary literature.
Course credit exclusion: AP/HUMA 4421 6.00.

AP/HUMA 4405 6.0  Asian Art: Zen Painting and Poetry

This course offers a chronological survey of paintings inspired by Ch'an and Zen Buddhism. The course also involves a close reading of poetry written by monks and laymen associated with this enigmatic and challenging Buddhist sect. Students are expected to engage fully in class discussion. Prerequisite: A 3000-level course in Chinese or Japanese religion and culture, or permission of the course director. Course credit exclusions: None.

AP/HUMA 4410 6.0A Narratives of the Family in Modern Korea

This course places the development of novels, tales, folk operas and other narratives focusing on the family within the context of changing cultural patterns in modern Korea.

Course Credit Exclusion: Prior to Fall 2009: AS/HUMA 4000D 6.0 (prior to Fall/Winter 2003-2004), AS/HUMA 4410 6.0

AP/HUMA 4415 6.0A Contemporary Japanese Literature, Film & Comics

This course examines the aesthetic and psychological principles underlying the conjoining of eros and death in Japanese literature and film, and how these principles have been developed, and exploited, during the 20th century.

Course Credit Exclusion: Prior to Fall 2009: AS/HUMA 4415 6.0; Prior to Fall/Winter 2003-2004: AS/HUMA 4000G 6.0

AP/HUMA 4416 6.0A Citing the Classics: The Premodern in Modern Japanese Literature

Many works by 20th-century Japanese authors and filmmakers are based on ancient texts like Noh plays, the Tale of Genji and Buddhist fables and folk tales. This course studies those classical antecedents and their modern interpretations within a cultural-historical perspective.

Course Credit Exclusion: Prior to Fall 2009 AS/HUMA 4416 6.0

AP/HUMA 4421 6.0A Feminine in Chinese Culture

This course explores the feminine idea in modern Chinese culture through such topics as love, sexuality, feminism and the women's liberation movement of the 20th century. The experience of Chinese women in Hong Kong, Taiwan and North America are also explored through contemporary literature.

Course Credit Exclusion: AP/HUMA 3940 6.0. Prior to Fall 2009: AS/HUMA 3940 6.0; AS/HUMA 4421 6.0

AP/HUMA 4425 6.0A Worlds Within, Worlds Without: The Self in Qing Prose And Poetry

This course explores the concept of self as it is expressed through the works of major writers and poets in China during the Qing dynasty (1644-1911).

Course Credit Exclusion: Prior to Fall 2009: AS/HUMA 4425 6.0

AP/HUMA 4430 6.0 Living Confucianism: Confucian Philosophy and Practice in Traditional and Contemporary East Asia

This research seminar examines the development of Confucianism in historical, philosophical and socio-political contexts across China, Japan, Korea, and Vietnam, with the goal of exploring the tradition's implications for both East Asian modernity and global culture.

In the first half of the course we will follow the development of Confucian thought and practice in imperial China and during relevant period in Japan, Korea, and Vietnam, with equal emphasis on the historical context of these changes, their social and political implications, and their philosophical significance. In the second half of the course we will analyze the ways that different groups, including East Asian modernizers and non-Asian scholars, have tried to relate Confucianism to emerging global issues.

Course Credit Exclusion: None. Prior to Fall 2009: AS/HUMA 4430 6.0

AP/HUMA 4435 3.0  Books and Photos East and West

Analyzes two forms of media, the book and the photograph, and two moments in their histories, East and West. In the first instance, examines the separate Western and Eastern trajectories in the development of print. In the second, the ways the Western technology of photography was appropriated in the East. We read both canonical and recent works in both of these fields.
Course credit exclusions: None.

AP/HUMA 4770 3.0 Buddhism in Modern Southeast Asia: Community, Conflict and Change

This course explores Buddhist responses to the changing conditions of modernity in Southeast Asia. Seeking to understand Buddhism as a living religion, it investigates how Buddhists have drawn on religious narratives, symbols and rituals to respond to social and political challenges from the nineteenth century to the present, including issues of religious reform, colonialism, nationalism and ethnicity.

AP/HUMA 4771 3.0 Buddhism as seen from the West: The Colonial Encounter and the Study of Buddhism

This course explores how the colonial encounter shaped the academic study of Buddhism and the image of Buddhism in the West. Reading popular and scholarly accounts of Buddhism written from the early nineteenth century to the present day, the course analyses how the legacy of and response to colonialism have coloured our understanding of Buddhism as a lived religion.

AP/HUMA 4800 6.0//CH 4880 6.0 Cultural Translation and Chinese Modernities

Analyzes what meanings of modern and contemporary Chinese literature from the 1900s to the present have both been produced and lost through cultural and media translation. Applies postmodern theories to examine fiction with their recreations into different cultures and into various media of stage productions, TV dramas and films. Investigates the cultures, history, and social conditions in Chinese modernities, both on the mainland and in the diasporas.
Prerequisites: Any 3000 level Chinese literature or culture course, or with permission of the department. Course credit exclusions: None.

Japanese Language and Literature

AP/JP 1000 6.0 Elementary Modern Standard Japanese

Basics of spoken Japanese, with strong emphasis on immediate practical usefulness in everyday situations, and on the relationship between facets of language and those of social phenomena. Writing is introduced after some competence in spoken Japanese is acquired: the two Kana syllabaries, approximately 120 Kanji 'Sino-Japanese characters' and elementary reading are introduced. Video files are available on the web for listening comprehension and for orientation to the culture, society and people.

Computer programs are used as tools to enhance students' further acquisition of the language. The course is structured to be self-contained at this level. Partially, it is also designed for general education purposes. Therefore, the course accommodates as well students who may not continue to study Japanese at higher levels in the future.

Prerequisite: None. No previous knowledge of the language is assumed

Course Credit Exclusion: None. Prior to Fall 2009: AS/JP 1000 6.0

AP/JP 2000 6.0 Intermediate Modern Standard Japanese

Further study of common grammatical forms and structures; items covered in AP/JP 1000 6.0 are reviewed and expanded. The main focus is on the use of complex sentences in situation and task-oriented conversation, strategy-centered reading and structure-based writing. Videotapes are available for listening comprehension. Approximately 330 additional Kanji 'Sino-Japanese characters' are introduced (450 in total).

Prerequisite: AP/JP 1000 6.0 or an equivalent background. Students who have not taken AP/JP 1000 6.0, but have studied Japanese elsewhere must take the placement test PRIOR TO ENROLMENT

Course Credit Exclusion: None. Prior to Fall 2009: AS/JP 2000 6.0

AP/JP 2700 6.0 Contemporary Japanese Culture and Society

This course provides an overview of contemporary Japanese culture and society to help students understand Japan and its people in the age of globalization and cross-cultural communication. Students have specific assignments to search on the internet for information relevant to lecture presentations, discussion and written work. The class lectures are augmented by videotapes.

Prerequisite: None. Taught in English.

Course Credit Exclusion: None. Prior to Fall 2009: AS/JP 2700 6.0

AP/JP 3000 6.0 Advanced Modern Standard Japanese

The aim of the course is to continue the work of AP/JP 2000 6.0 to the level at which students can function independently with everday continuous texts in various fields. The main focus is on discourse structure in the four skill areas; original and edited texts on various topics are read, summarized, translated and discussed. Technology Enhanced Learning (TEL) involves web browsing, email, wordprocessing and web presentaiton in Japanese. Videotapes will be shown for listening comprehension and discussion. Socio-cultural aspects are particularly emphasized to deepen the understanding of Japanese society and culture. Kyooiku Kanji 'Education Characters' (881) are covered.

Prerequisite: AP/JP 2000 6.0, or equivalent. Students who have not taken AP/JP 2000 6.0 must take the placement test PRIOR TO ENROLMENT

Course Credit Exclusion: None. Prior to Fall 2009: AS/JP 3000 6.0

AP/JP 3100 3.0 Japanese Linguistics I: The Structure of Modern Japanese Language 

The course examines the linguistic structure of the modern standard Japanese language. Topics include lexicon, phonology (sound structure), morphology (word structure), and syntax (sentence structure).
Prerequisites: AP/JP 1000 6.00 or AP/LING 1000 6.00. Course credit exclusions: None.

AP/JP 3751 3.0 Japanese Business Culture and Communication

Examines characteristics of Japanese corporate culture and aspects of management styles as well as patterns of Japanese communication styles, drawing on concepts from linguistics, communication, and cultural studies.
Pre/Corequisite: AP/JP 2700 6.00. Course credit exclusions: None.

AP/JP 4000 Advanced Reading in Contemporary Japanese

Readings in unannotated original essays and articles on current issues taken from periodicals; interpretation, translation, summarization and discussion of readings enable students to use a wide variety of Japanese materials independently. Recognition of Characters for Daily Use (1,945).

Prerequisite: AP/JP 3000 6.0 or equivalent

Course credit exclusions: Prior TO FALL 2009: AS/JP 4000 6.0

AP/JP 4010 6.0 Classical Japanese

In this course, classical Japanese language is studied using a wide range of Japanese texts. Prerequisites: AS/JP 3000 6.00 or equivalent; permission of the department.

Course Credit Exclusions: Prior to Fall 2009: AS/JP 4010 6.0; AS/JP 4800B 6.00 (prior to Fall/Winter 2003-2004).

AP/JP 4100 6.0 Teaching Japanese as a Foreign Second Language

This course offers comprehensive teacher education and training for the Japanese language. The main objective is to familiarize teachers with current theories, methodologies, and their practical applications developed in the relevant areas, with strong focus on the communicative approach, and computer assisted language learning and teaching. Prerequisites: AS/JP 4000 6.00 or equivalent (for non-native speakers of Japanese); TOEFL score: 580 or equivalent (for non-native speakers of English); BA or BA expected within a year (may be waived at the instructor's discretion); teaching experience preferred; AS/LING 3230 3.00 strongly recommended.

AP/JP 4120 6.0 Translation: Japanese – English; English – Japanese

This course stresses translation practice from and into Japanese, dealing with texts taken from various fields and sources. The focus is on discourse organization, cross-cultural differences and stylistics. Prerequisites: AS/JP 4000 6.00, or equivalent, or AS/JP 3000 6.00, with permission of the instructor; permission of the department.

Course credit exclusions: AS/JP 4800A 6.00 (prior to Fall/Winter 2003-2004). Note: This course requires Internet access.

Korean Language and Literature

AP/KOR 1000 6.0 Elementary Modern Standard Korean

This is an introductory Korean language course.The objective of the course is to equip students which basic spoken and written communicative skills in the interpersonal mode in most essential daily life situations. The course starts with the sounds of spoken Korean, the writing system Hangul, and greetings, and proceeds to basic communication, fundamentals of grammar, and elementary reading skills for simple sentences. Students will learn how to communicate basic needs, such as everyday activities, time, numbers, and location, as well as how to combine simple ideas in various ways. Students will also learn to communicate past experiences and future plans and needs, and to express personal perferences, interests and concerns.

Prerequisite: None; no previous knowledge of Korean is assumed. Students who have a limited knowledge of Korean, but whose knowledge is not at an adequate level to function at the intermediate level may be given permission to enrol in this course. Departmental Course Entry Authorization Slip is required PRIOR TO ENROLMENT.

Course Credit Exclusion: None. Prior to Fall 2009: AS/KOR 1000 6.0

AP/KOR 2000 6.0 Intermediate Modern Standard Korean

The course reviews topics of Korean grammar normally covered in an elementary course. The objective of the course is to equip students with communicative skills in speaking, reading and writing at the intermediate level in Korean, such as expressing various stances of the speaker—eg.judgement, interference, and evaluation or subjective assessment of ideas—and expressing more complex relations between events, such as cause, reason, purpose, condition, concession, intention and background. Skills for simple narration and written report will be enhanced. Students are expected to develop a lengthy narrative discourse on personal experience.

Prerequisite: AP/KOR 1000 6.0; or with permission of department, an equivalent knowledge gained elsewhere. Course Entry Authorization Slip is required PRIOR TO ENROLMENT.The course should be of particular interest to students who have gained some knowledge of the language in the Korean heritage language program.

Course Credit Exclusion: None. Prior to Fall 2009: AS/KOR 2000 6.0

AP/KOR 3000 6.0A Advanced Modern Standard Korean

This course continues the work of AS/KOR 2000 6.0 to the level at which the students can function independently using everday continuous texts in various fields. The main focus is on discourse structure in all four-skill areas. Original and edited texts are read, summarized, translated and discussed. Socio-cultural aspects are particularly emphasized to deepen the understanding of Korean society and culture.

Prerequisite: ASK/KOR 2000 6.0; or with permission of department, an equivalent knowledge gained elsewhere. Course Entry Authorization slip is required PRIOR TO ENROLMENT.

AP/KOR 3600 6.0 Contemporary Korean Culture

This course is designed to introduce students to contemporary Korean culture, identity, and society. It seeks to help students develop a dynamic understanding of modern Korea by taking an interdisciplinary approach to cultural and social political issues of Korean society. The course focuses contemporary Korean identities and popular culture such as Korean films, dramas and popular music.

Prerequisite: None. No previous knowledge of Korean is assumed. The course should be of particular interest to students who are interested in understanding Korea by exploring Korean identifies and contemporary popular culture.

Course Credit Exclusion: None. Prior to Fall 2009: AS/KOR 3600 6.0

AP/KOR 3650 3.0 Understanding Korea through Korean Films

This course aims to enhance students' understanding of a variety of historical, social, cultural issues of Korean society by analyzing relevant Korean films. It examines close relationships between cinematic representations and modern Korean history and society. Following the historical trajectory of Korean cinema from 1990's to the present, the course provides opportunities to engage a critical thinking of the dynamics between nation, history, society, and cinema.
Course credit exclusions: None.

AP/KOR 3800 3.0 Language and Society in Korea

Provides students in diverse majors with a general overview of the connections between language and society in Korea and investigates how the language has reflected the dynamics of Korean society throughout its history. In particular, we examine language use in broad social, cultural and historical contexts and also compare and contrast the range of sociolinguistic practices in Korea with other language communities. Although the Korean language is the main focus, other languages coexisting in Korean society will be discussed. Prerequisite: AP/KOR 1000 6.00 or equivalent or permission of the Instructor.

Music – Faculty of Fine Arts

FA/MUSI 1047 3.0 Chinese Classical Ensemble

Provides practical and repertoire studies in traditional Chinese orchestral techniques (yangqin, erhu, dizi,xiao, pipa, etc.). Open to majors/non-majors.

FA/MUSI 1048 3.0 Japanese Music

Provides practical and repertoire studies in traditional instrumental techniques (shakuhachi, koto etc.) Students concentrate on issues of performance such as tone colour, rhythmic accuracy and nuance and ensemble performance. Open to majors/non-majors.

FA/MUSI 1096 3.0 Korean Drum Ensemble

Provides practical instruction in the folk repertoires of Korean ensemble drumming. Students study the technique and rhythmic patterns for various instruments: the jango (hour-glass drum), buk (bass drum), sogo (fan drum) and small gongs. Traditional singing and dancing are included. Open to all majors/non-majors/minors.

FA/MUSI 2047 3.0 Chinese Classical Ensemble

Offers practical and repertoire studies in traditional Chinese orchestral techniques (chin, erhu etc.) Students learn and perform pieces from the repertoire while concentrating on appropriate instrumental techniques.

Prerequisite: Permission of the course director. No prior experience is necessary. Open to non-majors.

FA/MUSI 2048 3.0 Japanese Music

Offers practical and repertoire studies in traditional instrumental techniques (shakuhachi, koto etc.) Students concentrate on issues of performance such as tone colour, rhythmic accuracy and nuance and ensemble performance.

Prerequisite: Permission of the course director. No prior experience is necessary. Open to non-majors.

FA/MUSI 2096 3.0 Korean Drum Ensemble

Offers practical instruction in the folk repertoires of Korean ensemble drumming. Students study the technique and rhythmic patterns for various instruments: the jango (hour-glass drum), buk (bass drum), sogo (fan drum) and small gongs. Traditional singing and dancing are included.

Prerequisite: FA/MUSI 1096 3.0. Open to all majors/non-majors/minors.

FA/MUSI 3047 3.0 Chinese Classical Ensemble

Provides practical and repertoire studies in traditional Chinese orchestral techniques (chin, erhu etc.) Students learn and perform pieces from the repertoire while concentrating on appropriate instrumental techniques. A continuation of FA/MUSI 2047 3.0.

Prerequisite: Permission of the course director. Open to majors and non-majors.

FA/MUSI 3048 3.0 Japanese Music

Provides practical and repertoire studies in traditional instrumental techniques (shakuhachi, koto etc.) Students concentrate on issues of performance such as tone colour, rhythmic accuracy and nuance, and ensemble performance. A continuation of FA/MUSI 2048 3.0.

Prerequisite: Permission of the course director. Open to majors and non-majors.

FA/MUSI 3096 3.0 Korean Drum Ensemble

Offers practical instruction in the folk repertoires of Korean ensemble drumming. Students study the technique and rhythmic patterns for various instruments: the jango (hour-glass drum), buk (bass drum), sogo (fan drum) and small gongs. Traditional singing and dancing are included.

Prerequisites: FA/MUSI 2096 3.0. Open to all majors/non-majors/minors.

FA/MUSI 4047 3.0 Chinese Classical Ensemble

Offers practical and repertoire studies in traditional Chinese orchestral techniques (chin, erhu etc.) Students learn and perform pieces from the repertoire while concentrating on appropriate instrumental techniques. A continuation of FA/MUSI 3047 3.0.

Prerequisite: Permission of the course director. Open to majors and non-majors.

FA/MUSI 4048 3.0 Japanese Music

Offers practical and repertoire studies in traditional instrumental techniques (shakuhachi, koto etc.) Students concentrate on issues of performance such as tone colour, rhythmic accuracy and nuance, and ensemble performance. A continuation of FA/MUSI 3048 3.0.

Prerequisite: Permission of the course director. Open to majors and non-majors.

FA/MUSI 4096 3.0 Korean Drum Ensemble

Offers practical instruction in the folk repertoires of Korean ensemble drumming. Students study the technique and rhythmic patterns for various instruments: the jango (hour-glass drum), buk (bass drum), sogo (fan drum) and small gongs. Traditional singing and dancing are included.

Prerequisite: FA/MUSI 3096 3.0. Open to all majors/non-majors/minors.

Philosophy

AP/PHIL 2035 3.0 Asian Philosophical Traditions

This course is an introduction to the major philosophical traditions of India and China. Special emphasis will be placed on themes of freedom, duty, courage, non-violence, critical thinking and happiness. Students will be encouraged to search for ways of making the philosophies practical in their everyday lives.

Course Credit Exclusion: None. Prior to Fall 2009: AS/PHIL 2035 3.0

AP/PHIL 3450 3.0 Modern Chinese Philosophy

This course will begin with an introduction to major modes of thought in traditional China.  The major part of this course, however, will be devoted to studying contemporary Chinese philosophy with special emphasis on the philosophy of Mao.
Course credit exclusions: None.

PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusion: AK/PHIL 3450 3.00.

AP/PHIL 4651 3.0 (AP/HREQ 4651 3.0) Chinese Rights and Virtues in East Asia

This course compares and contrasts Chinese virtues of benevolence, propriety, righteousness, wisdom and faithfulness with Western human rights in both contemporary and ancient perspectives. The course compares universal claims of Western social and cultural rights with particular forms of virtue in Chinese society.

Political Science

AP/POLS 3220 3.0 Comparative Foreign Policy Analysis

An introduction to the objectives and instruments of understanding foreign policy from a comparative perspective. Special attention will be devoted to the United States and its inter-connections with the North Pacific in the 20th century. Points of national comparison will include China, Japan and Russia/USSR. A principal theme will be the interaction of domestic and external sources of foreign policy decisions.

Themes: Global Politics; Canadian Democracy in a North American Context; Political Organization and Communication; Political Economy and Political Power.

Course Credit Exclusion: AP/POLS 3230 6.0, GL/POLS 4605 3.0. Prior to Fall 2009: AS/POLS 3220 3.0, AS/POLS 3230 6.0

AP/POLS 3230 3.0 Global Issues in Foreign Policy

Increasingly, problems such as environmental degradation, sustainable development, the uses and effects of technology in financial, production and communication systems, human rights abuses, refugee and population movements and militarization, require solutions that can only be realized within a system of multilateral cooperation. The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the foreign policy decision-making process in terms of these global issues.

Course Credit Exclusions: None. PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusions: AK/AS/POLS 3230 3.00, AK/POLS 3209C 3.00 (prior to Fall/Winter 2000-2001).

GL/POLS 3220 6.0 Comparative Political Systems: Developing Areas

A comparative and critical analysis of the process of system-transformation and political change in developing areas focusing upon the current theoretical literature which attempts to conceptualize, explain and predict the problems of political development and modernization in these changing societies.

GL/POLS 3290 6.0 Government and Politics of China

An analysis of post-1840 China's revolutionary change focusing upon the collapse of traditional order, the rise of nationalism and revolutionary movements, the development of the New Democratic Revolution and Mao's thought, and the politics of socialist construction in post-1949 China.

AP/POLS 3510 3.0 China: Path to Modernization and Democracy

This course examines the origins and development of the modern Chinese political system. Emphasis is on the role of Mao Zedong, the post-1949 period and the reform of Chinese socialism.

Themes: Development and Inequality in the Global South; Global Politics; Political Organizing and Communication.

Course Credit Exclusion: Prior to Fall 2009: AS/POLS 3510 3.0, AS/POLS 3510 6.0

AP/POLS 3515 3.0 China: 21ST Century Superpower?

China's relationship with the outside world has been one of the dominant themes in its development. How is China moving from its position of isolation to become a 21st century superpower? We focus on the post-1949 period, in particular, the China-Soviet relationship; American-China relations; China and Japan; China and India; Canadian-China policy; China's relations with Taiwan and Hong Kong; and China's integration into the global economy. A significant portion of the course will focus on the China trade and on key issues involved in doing business in China.

Themes: Global Politics; Development and Inequality in the Global South; Violence and Security.

Course Credit Exclusion: Prior to Fall 2009: AS/POLS 3515 3.0, AS/POLS 3510 6.0

AP/POLS 3591 3.0 Political Economy of Asia and Pacific

The course studies the political and economic changes in the region of Asia and the Pacific and their implications for the global capitalist system. Interactions between the state, capital, classes, and gender are discussed.

Themes: Global Politics; Development and Inequality in the Global South; Political Economy and Political Power.

Prerequisites: AS/POLS 2930 6.0 (previously 2920 6.0)

Course Credit Exclusion: Prior to Fall 2009: AS/POLS 3591 3.0; GL/ILST 4680 6.0, GL/POLS 4680 6.0

AP/POLS 4265 3.0 Human Rights and Democracy in Asia

The course examines the international politics of human rights and democracy in the region as a window on debates over the university, origins, and purposes of international human rights norms in a context of globalization. It critically explores assertions that the successes of East Asian economies are due to their cultural characteristics and illiberal, non-democratic political systems.

Themes: Development and Inequality in the Global South; Law, Social Justice, and Ethics

Course credit exclusions: Prior to Fall 2009: AS/POLS 4265 3.0; AS/POLS 4705 3.0

AP/POLS 4285 3.0 The International Political Economy of Eastern Asia

This seminar examines the changing dynamics of political, economic and security relations in and among the countries of Eastern Asia.

Course Credit Exclusion: Prior to Fall 2009: AS/POLS 4285 3.0, AS/POLS 4700 3.0 (prior to Fall/Winter 2001-2002)

AP/POLS 4510 3.0 Advanced Topics in Chinese Politics

This course examines advanced topics in the politics of contemporary China, and compares competing social science research methods for field investigation. The course is organized according to two major topics in Chinese politics: 1) political reform in China; 2) the political economy of China's transition. Students will be expected to apply key Chinese terminology used in the study of Chinese politics.

Prerequisite: AP/POLS 3510 3.0, AP/POLS 3515 3.0 or permission from the course instructor.

Course Credit Exclusion: None. Prior to Fall 2009: AS/POLS 4510 3.0

AP/POLS 4595 3.0M Asia in the New Global Order

Using Southeast Asia as its focus, this course addresses questions relating to economic development, political change and regional security in the emerging global order. It stimulates interest in politics and international relations of developing countries in Southeast Asia.

Themes: Development and Inequality in the Global South; Global Politics; Political Economy and Political Power.

GL/POLS 4685 3.0 The Foreign Policy of Major Asian State

A comparative study of the foreign policies in China, Japan and India, with an emphasis on policy-making and policy outputs. Examples will be drawn from territorial, security and economic issues.

Prerequisite: GL/POLS 2920 6.0 or permission of the instructor

Degree Credit Exclusion: GL/POLS 4010 3.0 (Fall/Winter 2001-2002)

Social Science

AP/SOSC 2430 3.0 Peoples and Cultures of Southeast Asia

This course examines the cultures and social systems of Southeast Asia. Beginning with an examination of the ecology and prehistory of the region, a brief journey through Southeast Asian cultural history provides an understanding of a number of important issues and topics in the region. These include Buddhism, colonialism, tribes, and urbanism. It concludes with a review of recent developments, including the establishment of ASEAN (Association of Southeast Asian Nations) and the effects of globalization on Pacific Rim nations.

Course Credit Exclusion: Prior to Fall 2009: AS/SOSC 2430 3.0/6.0, AS/SOSC 1460 3.0

AP/SOSC 2435 6.0 Introduction to South Asian Studies

This course is the core course for the South Asian Studies double major Program. It introduces students to contemporary South Asia by exploring six inter-related themes: history and state formation; political economy; institutions and governments; social movements; environment and development; and culture and identity (including issues relating to the South Asian diaspora).

Four weeks are devoted to each of these topics; in the course of those four weeks, the major issues within the themes are discussed. As far as possible, the course will present material written by South Asian authors writing out of South Asia. While the instructors will assume no specialised knowledge of South Asia, it is recommended that students take the Foundations courses in Development Studies before enrolling for this course.

Course Credit Exclusion: None. Prior to Fall 2009: AS/SOSC 2435 6.0

AP/SOSC 2600 9.0 (AP/HUMA 2800 9.0) Introduction to the Study of Religion

This course introduces students to some of the basic research methods used in the Humanities and Social Sciences to study the religious. We explore the history, literature and practices of the religions of South Asia (Buddhism, Hinduism), East Asia (China, Japan, Korea), Europe and West Asia (Judaism, Christianity and Islam), Africa and the Americas, though not all traditions may be examined every year. In translation, we study sacred texts, both written and oral, and we analyze conceptions of transcendent reality and the human condition.

We also examine how human beings, past and present, interrelate with the spiritual realm in individual experience and communal life. Our overall objective is to identify and compare, critically and constructively, similarities and differences among the many ways of being religious. As a Foundations course, this course includes a critical skills dimension. Through the comparative study of the world's religions, this course is designed to introduce students to some of the basic research methods and analytical tools used in the Humanities and the Social Sciences, including the critical reading of texts, the study of religious phenomena, comparative description and comparative argument. Basic essay writing skills will also be reviewed.

Course Credit Exclusion: None. Prior to Fall 2009: AS/SOSC 2600 9.0

AP/SOSC 3575 3.0 Popular Cultures, East and West

Compares popular culture in Canada and the U.S., including movies, television, literature and sports with everyday media in China and Japan. Explores modern and ancient cultural forms in relation to stereotypes, concepts of civilization, religion, philosophy, self, family and society.
Course credit exclusion: AP/REI 3575 6.00 (prior to Fall 2013).

PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusion: AK/SOSC 3575 6.00.

AP/SOSC 3735 3.0 Postcolonial Urbanism: Asian Cities in Context

This course considers themes in postcolonial urbanism with reference to East and Southeast Asian cities. The course examines some of the primary issues confronting contemporary cities, with an emphasis on reading the city and understanding the experience of urban life.

Course Credit Exclusion: None. Prior to Fall 2009: AS/SOSC 3735 3.0

Visual Arts - Faculty of Fine Arts

FA/VISA 2340 6.0A The Art of Asia

Provides an interdisciplinary introduction to the art and architecture of East Asia explores a wide range of representations from artifacts and artworks to popular media and the built-environment. Discussions focus on issues of identity formation, political ethics, religious authorities, the nation-state, modernity, colonialism, and race/gender relations. Open to non-majors.

Course Credit Exclusion: FA/VISA 2340 6.0

FA/VISA 3343 3.0A The Art of China

Offers a chronological survey of the visual arts of China with an emphasis on painting and sculpture. Oriental art, as it relates to religion and philosophy, is also discussed, as well as occasional forays into Chinese poetry.

FA/VISA 3344 3.0A The Art of Japan and Korea

Explores current issues in visual and spatial culture of Japan and Korea. It draws readings from various disciplines to discuss artistic and cultural products in the contexts of social and political transformation, negotiation between tradition and modernity, forces of globalization, and contestation over identities in the two countries. Students learn about the intertwined cultural history of Japan and Korea.

Course Credit Exclusion: FA/VISA 3344 3.0 prior to 2006

FA/VISA 3345 3.0M Visual Culture in Modern Asia

Examines visual culture at different localities of modern Asia that builds a framework for understanding artistic and cultural activities in the 20th century in their historical and social context. As modern Asia is not a unified but dynamic space, we will explore various kinds of visual and built environments including art works, exhibitions, literature, popular culture and events. Visual representations are analyzed as crucial in the formation of the norms of history, culture and politics of the region.

Discussion focuses on the binary conception of "the East" versus "the West", and notions of "Asia," "tradition," "modernity," and nationalism in particular postcolonial conditions of East Asia. Questions such as what is "Asia"? How do we define the notion of "modernity" in Asia? These and other questions seek to construct and deconstruct fundamental assumptions on "modern Asian art," examining contemporary theories of art, culture, and nation. Students develop visual and analytic skills needed to read Asian modern art and culture in relation to growing tension and interaction between national, regional and global flows.

FA/VISA 4340A 3.0 Asian Art: Zen Painting and Poetry

This course offers a chronological survey of paintings inspired by Ch'an and Zen Buddhism. The course also involves a close reading of poetry written by monks and laymen associated with this enigmatic and challenging Buddhist sect. Students are expected to engage fully in class discussion. Prerequisite: A 3000-level course in Chinese or Japanese religion and culture, or permission of the course director. Course credit exclusions: None.

FA/VISA 4800L 3.0 Selected Topics: Asian Art

Provides advanced studies in traditional and/or contemporary art of Asia. Topic to be determined by the instructor in relation to their scholarly expertise. This course will likely require weekly readings and discussion, and the writing of a research seminar paper. Prerequisite: FA/VISA 1340 6.00, FA/VISA 2340 6.00 or permission of the course director.

Theatre - School of the Arts, Media, Performance and Design

FA/THEA 4220 6.0 Non-European Theatre

Provides a study of ritual and theatre, including Indian, Chinese, South-east Asian and Japanese theatres. Students may pursue interests in other non-European areas. Open to non-majors.